Your human, its’ okay to feel it all

That’s true, you’re only human, and it’s perfectly fine to experience whatever feelings you want. Feelings and moods are frequently mistaken with emotions, but the three concepts are not interchangeable. What exactly are emotions? Emotion is defined as “a complex reaction pattern integrating experiential, behavioral, and physiological factors,” according to the American Psychological Association (APA). Emotions are how people react to issues or circumstances that are important to them. They are a type of conscious mental reaction (such as rage or fear) that is subjectively felt as a strong emotion focused on a single object and is usually accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body. A subjective experience, a physiological response, and a behavioral or expressive response are the three components of emotional experiences. Emotional experiences give rise to feelings. This is considered in the same category as hunger or pain because a person is aware of the sensation. An emotion produces a feeling, which can be impacted by memories, beliefs, and other variables. Mood on the other hand is described by the APA as “any short-lived emotional state, usually of low intensity.”[1]

Emotions are, on one level, like energy waves that vary in shape and intensity, much like ocean waves. Their nature, like all-natural events, is for them to appear and vanish swiftly. Several things can happen if you try to stop this process by acting out or suppressing it. When it comes to dealing with uncomfortable emotions, most individuals respond in one of two ways: they act out or suppress. The dangers of suppressing those powerful emotions are considerably worse.

Unfortunately (and ironically), attempting to “talk yourself out of your emotions” frequently leads to “greater rumination and perseveration.” In other words, you will continue to think about and hang on to the emotions you are attempting to avoid. Anyone who has had a deep-tissue massage can attest to how the body stores suppressed emotions. Suppression is stored in the body and causes a slew of negative consequences, such as anxiety, depression, stress-related illness, substance misuse, and suicide.[2]

What about Repressing emotions?

Repression is the other most prevalent method. The tendency to ignore unpleasant feelings is referred to as repression. Repressed emotions are unconsciously avoided emotions. This is when painful feelings, thoughts, or memories are pushed out of your consciousness involuntarily. This allows you to forget about them. You might do this to protect your positive self-image. These are feelings that haven’t been processed. They can, however, influence your actions. Over time, repressed emotions might lead to health issues. If you were raised in a dysfunctional family, you may have learned to suppress your feelings. These feelings may include fear, anger, pain, or shame.[3] Pennebaker and his colleagues (1997) found that people who conceal their emotions also reduce their body’s immune function, rendering them more susceptible to illnesses ranging from common colds to cancer.[4]

Repression VS Suppression

Sigmund Freud proposed suppression as a voluntary kind of repression in 1892. It’s the deliberate act of pushing undesired, anxiety-inducing ideas, memories, feelings, fantasies, and desires out of one’s conscious awareness. Suppression, the unconscious process of removing painful memories, ideas, and impulses from consciousness, is more amenable to controlled tests than repression. If you’re grieving the loss of a loved one or the end of a relationship, you may make the conscious decision to stop thinking about it in order to go on with your life. In another instance, you may feel compelled to tell your employer how you truly feel about him and his heinous behavior, but you conceal your feelings because you need the job. The desire is aware in both circumstances, but it is prevented by willpower arising from a rational decision to avoid the behavior. In general, “forgotten” thoughts, memories, and desires can have an impact on actions, conscious thoughts, and feelings, and might manifest as symptoms or even as mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and so on.[5]

However, there is another technique to control our emotions: feeling and processing them. Allow it to burn at the moment, and if necessary, take a break to regulate your emotions. Although not everyone processes information in the same manner, you should be able to recognize the indicators. Identify and label your feelings while remembering to be kind and compassionate to yourself, and then decide how you’ll deal with them — either by deciding how you’ll fix the problem if you have control over it, or how you’ll cope with them better in the future if you don’t. You can try several ways of processing feelings to see what works best for you. Journaling, painting, venting to a friend, spending time in nature, meditation, and so on are all alternatives. Everyone needs an outlet for their emotions, whether it’s crying or yelling at a wall—it’ll feel a lot better than keeping them bottled up inside. Emotional regulation is vital because it enables you to live a healthy lifestyle, both mentally and physically. Take care of yourself, you know—the majority of the work is done on the inside, and the outside world can only add to that.

References

[1]Posted June 27, 2019 by UWA | Psychology and Counseling News. “The Science of Emotion: Exploring the Basics of Emotional Psychology.” UWA Online, 22 June 2020, https://online.uwa.edu/news/emotional-psychology/.

[2]About the Author Margaret Cullen Margaret Cullen, and Margaret Cullen Margaret Cullen. “How to Regulate Your Emotions without Suppressing Them.” Greater Good, https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_regulate_your_emotions_without_suppressing_them.

[3]“Repressed Emotions: How to Spot and Release Them.” WebMD, WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/what-to-know-repressed-emotions.

[4]Pub, Open Access. “Consequences of Repression of Emotion: Physical Health, Mental Health and General Well Being.” Pen Access Pub, openaccesspub.org/ijpr/article/999.

[5]Berlin, Heather A. “Defense Mechanisms: Neuroscience Meets Psychoanalysis.” Scientific American, Scientific American, 1 Apr. 2009, http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/neuroscience-meets-psychoanalysis/.

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Why is depression more prevalent in females?

Depression is more common among females (5.1%) than males (3.6%). Women are nearly twice more likely to be diagnosed with depression compared to men. The etiology of depression appears to differ, with women more typically exhibiting internalizing symptoms and males experiencing externalizing symptoms.[1] In a study of dizygotic twins, for example, women were more sensitive to interpersonal interactions, whereas men were more sensitive to external professional and goal-oriented factors.[2]Women also encounter specific types of depression-related illnesses, such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, postpartum depression, and postmenopausal depression and anxiety, which are linked to ovarian hormone changes and may contribute to the increased frequency in women. The fact that increased depression prevalence correlates with hormonal changes in women, particularly around adolescence, before menstruation, after pregnancy, and during perimenopause, implies that female hormonal oscillations may be a trigger for depression.[3]

Unequal power and status

Regrettably, this is a man’s world. Not only do women have to go to work like men, but they may also be expected to shoulder the burden of running a household, raising children, caring for elderly relatives, and putting up with sexism. Furthermore, we must be concerned not only about our children and families, but also about the rising occurrence of sexual harassment. According to research, nearly a third of women working in traditionally male-dominated trades in the United States said they were sexually harassed frequently or always. A poll was carried out involving 9408 adults(51 percent men and 49 percent women) in eight countries (Australia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, South Africa, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Vietnam), roughly a quarter of men surveyed said, “It is sometimes or always acceptable for an employer to ask or expect an employee to have intimate relations such as sex with them.” Thirty-nine percent of Indian men polled believed it was okay to wolf-whistle or cat-call a colleague on occasion, if not usually. “It is sometimes or always appropriate to pinch a colleague’s bottom in jest,” said 36% of 25-34-year-olds in the United Kingdom. In the United States, “44% of men aged 18-34 stated that expressing a sexual joke to a coworker is sometimes or always acceptable.”[4] Why is society failing to effectively condemn violence against women?

Sociocultural Reinforcements for example “…the ideology of men’s entitlement and privilege over women, social norms regarding masculinity, and the need to assert male control or power, enforce gender roles or prevent, discourage or punish what is considered to be unacceptable female behavior”

CEDAW, 2017, para. 19

This belief system consists of deeply ingrained attitudes, values, conventions, and prejudices against women that serve to perpetuate men’s dominance over women. Unconscious prejudice has a negative impact on women’s autonomy and integrity at work, and is linked to societal gender stereotypes, which can impede women’s professional advancement and most especially contribute to emotional distress.

Cultural factors

Women’s greater rates of depression aren’t only related to biology. Cultural stresses play a role, particularly in developing nations where gender roles are ingrained. Western societies are fortunate in that they seek for equality in women’s rights. In South Asia, the widespread impact of boy preference is predominant. Wife battering and female suicide have been connected to women’s reproductive roles, including their expected role of having children, the repercussions of infertility, and the failure to generate a male child.[5]

The majority of societies are patriarchal in nature. People typically believe that “girls are born to be fed for the rest of their life” and “boys are destined to earn and support the entire family.” A newborn boy’s birth is celebrated, whereas a baby girl’s birth is frowned upon. In some rural areas of India, the situation is even worse, with girls being denied their right to live. In India, sex selection during pregnancy is still widespread, where women are forced to terminate a female fetus. In one of the rural areas of India, it happened that, when a woman returned home from the hospital with her newborn daughter cradled in her arms, her mother-in-law mashed a poisonous coriander into a dollop of oil and pushed it down the infant’s throat. The explanation for this was that sacrificing a girl ensured a male in the future pregnancy.[6]

Evidently, a woman born in this region is unwanted, and if she isn’t killed, she suffers the repercussions and is vulnerable to all of society’s rage. I’m curious, people that hold the believe that they matter more than others–particularly due to differences in gender, skin color, or sexual orientation, etc. If you possess such a mindset– Do you honestly believe you matter more than others? If so, why?

Some countries still hold ancient traditions and customs that promote various sorts of violence against women. These include honor murders, exchange marriages, Quran weddings, Karo-kari, bride price, dowry, female circumcision, doubting women’s ability to testify, confinement to the home, and denial of their right to choose their partner are examples of these practices. If you’re reading this and you don’t live in a culture like this, first-off, consider yourself fortunate; second, imagine living in such a society for a moment. What emotions come to mind when you think about it? According to a study conducted in Pakistan, pressure from husbands and in-laws was the root cause for women to commit suicide. Sad to say, the system in these societies accepts these atrocious acts. There is no way out for this female, and law enforcers are usually hesitant to intervene because they refer the situation as a domestic conflict. Furthermore, women’s mental health is frequently neglected[6].

Let’s discuss female genital mutilation. It entails the partial or complete removal of external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. Bare in mind that this practice has no health benefits whatsoever. WHO mentions that more than 200 million girls and women alive today have been cut in 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia where FGM is concentrated. This practice is carried out on young girls between infancy and age 15. Culture is all fine and dandy until its norms become a violation of human rights. This is beyond anomalous and deviant. FGM is an extreme violation of the human rights of girls and women. It is an extreme kind of prejudice against women, and it represents deep-rooted gender inequity. It is nearly always carried out on minors and is a violation of the rights of children. The practice also breaches a person’s right to health, security, and physical integrity, as well as the right to be free of torture and cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment, and also the right to life if the process results in death. For the societies that perform FGM, it is considered a vital element of raising a girl in preparation for adulthood and marriage. It is thought to assist a woman resist extramarital sexual acts by ensuring premarital virginity, marital fidelity, and libido.[7] In simple terms, this is depriving women of their sexual pleasure in order to fulfill men’s sexual pleasures. I’m not sure about the females reading this, but I’m enraged.

As a woman writing this, my emotions are indescribably torturous- I have failed to articulate the right words that express the current feelings about this. All these acts, dehumanize girls and women. They rob them of their individuality. They deny girls and women their right to emotions. Because society owns every part of you, they strip you of your dreams, imagination, creativity, and expression. They undoubtedly provoke suicidal thoughts, and many succeed since it is the only way out of the awful reality into which they were born. They deprive women of their right to exist.

No wonder, depression is prevalent more in women than men. Women are simply attempting to navigate this man-made world; Striving for equal rights hoping they will prevail not only in western societies but also, developing nations. Most importantly, the females aim to retain their sanity while contending for equality.

References

[1]Bartels M, Cacioppo JT, van Beijsterveldt TC, et al.Exploring the association between well-being and psychopathology in adolescents.Behav Genet 2013;43:177–90.

[2]Kendler KS, Gardner CO.Sex differences in the pathways to major depression: a study of opposite-sex twin pairs.Am J Psychiatry 2014;171:426–35.

[3]Albert, Paul R. “Why Is Depression More Prevalent in Women?” Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience : JPN, vol. 40, no. 4, July 2015, pp. 219–221. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1503/jpn.150205.

[4]Gendered Power Inequalities, https://www.endvawnow.org/es/articles/1930-gendered-power-inequalities-.html.

[5]Validate User, https://academic.oup.com/bmb/article/57/1/33/301595.

[6]Niaz, Unaiza, and Sehar Hassan. “Culture and Mental Health of Women in South-East Asia.” World Psychiatry : Official Journal of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), Masson Italy, June 2006, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1525125/.

[7]“Female Genital Mutilation.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/female-genital-mutilation.

Depression

For some, its like a crawling thought inside your head that you can’t control. For some, it’s like a cold that challenges the warmth in the body. For some, it’s like aches in the stomach, back, and top shoulders. For some, it’s like urging to get up out of bed but find themselves staying longer than usual or perhaps the wakefulness during the night. For some, it’s like feeling worthless and a failure at everything. For some, it’s like hopelessness. For some, it’s like being tired all the time. For some, it’s eating endlessly despite the feeling of hunger- others quite the opposite, not eating. For some, it’s like being stuck in a loop in time. For some, it’s like barely floating on the ocean. For some, it’s like being lodging between nothingness and striving. For some, it’s like screams inside of you- hoping for someone to hear you. For some, it’s being trapped somewhere but nowhere at the same time. For some, it’s like the thrill of pleasure from pain. For some, it’s like chugging glasses of wine or any other alcoholic beverage. For some, it’s like continuously feeling the void of what is. For some, it’s like being uncomfortable with silence- since thoughts get extremely loud. For some, it’s like being invisible. For some…

Depression is a mental disorder that affects how you feel, think and act. And it can strike anyone. It is a leading cause of disability worldwide and is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease. People suffering from depression today are over 300 million according to WHO. Depression is different from usual mood fluctuations and short-lived emotional responses to challenges in everyday life. Especially when recurrent and with moderate or severe intensity, depression may become a serious health condition. It can cause the affected person to suffer greatly and function poorly at work, at school and affect relationships. Depression is more prevalent in females compared to males-with statistics of 5.1% to 3.6% respectively. There are different forms of depression, such as persistent depressive disorder (also called dysthymia), postpartum depression, psychotic depression, seasonal affective disorder, and major depression. [1,2]

“It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, including low mood, loss of positivity, feeling guilty or worthless, sleep disturbances, fatigue, lack of energy, changes in appetite, loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed and thoughts of death or suicide,” says Wayne Drevets, M.D, Vice President, Disease Area Leader in Mood Disorders, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. [3]

depression in developing countries.

Not so long ago, many psychiatrists believed depression was a uniquely western phenomenon. One typical branch of this belief was advocated by JC Carothers, a psychiatrist and WHO expert. He wrote an influential dissertation on the “African mind” in 1953, arguing that the continent’s inhabitants lacked the psychological development and sense of personal responsibility required to suffer despair. In 1993, Vikram Patel, a psychiatrist, moved to Zimbabwe for a research fellowship. His goal was to find evidence for the view, which was widespread among psychiatrists at the time, that what appeared to be depression in developing countries was actually a response to deprivation and injustice – conditions compounded by colonization.

He began his research by conducting focus groups and cultures with traditional healers and those who cared for patients with mental illnesses, followed by interviews with patients. He inquired as to what mental disease was, what caused it, and how it could be treated. The most common ailment had a name: kufungisisa, which means excessive anxiety about a condition in Shona, the indigenous language. What surprised Patel the most were the patients’ responses.- No matter what they called it, no matter what they believed to be the cause or the treatment. They highlighted hopelessness, tiredness, unwillingness to face their difficulties, and a loss of enthusiasm in life – classic indicators of depression.

Patel had previously assumed that depression was merely an appropriate response to misfortune. Your husband is an alcoholic who beats you. Your crop was a failure. Your family is evicted. Your children are starving. Of course, you’re depressed. You and your family require alcoholism treatment, fertilizer subsidies, and a secure job. What role does psychotherapy play in this? Well, there is a difference between sadness and depression. Sadness is a natural reaction to misfortune. Depression, on the other hand, is not the same thing. Yes, the poor are more prone to depression but that does not indicate that poverty causes depression- it is a correlation however. Depression is like a veil of negative thoughts that paralyzes the person suffering, preventing her from responding to traumatic occurrences.[4]

Depression manifests distinctively in developing countries than in more developed ones. The causes of depression are disturbing: war, torture, epidemics; stressors of daily life in poor countries, such as poverty, extreme food shortages, death of a loved one, etc. A total of 161 papers in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported on surveys of 80,000 refugee studies found a correlation between torture and depression. Syrian refugees in Lebanon were most typically diagnosed with depression and anxiety, according to Doctors Without Borders. According to one study conducted in rural Pakistan, half of the women examined suffered from depression. This was linked to their early marriage and motherhood, several pregnancies, and adjusting to a new life that they had not chosen.[5]

South Asia represents approximately 23% of the global population and one-fifth of the world’s mental health cases- countries include India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Bhutan, and the Maldives. Characterized by significant poverty rates in this region, roughly 150–200 million people have a recognized psychiatric disease and have inadequate access to mental health services. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent in all South Asian countries. In another study, rural India had 430 persons out of every thousand at-risk individuals who were depressed — about half of the population. It was found that 39.6 percent of the population suffered from mild to serious depression according to research. The burden of depressive disorders was higher among females and older adults than among males and young people. Previous studies have found that females are more likely than males to experience adverse life events that are strongly linked to the onset of depressive episodes, such as gender discrimination, physical and sexual abuse, relationship breakdown, intimate partner violence, antenatal and postnatal stress, and critical cultural norms. [6]

Untreated depression can take a toll on physical health. It may crimple your thoughts and affect they way you eat, sleep, feel., cardiovascular diseases, physical pain, et cetera. It can also lead to suicide. Note that -The majority of people with serious depression do not attempt suicide. However, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, more than 90% of people who die by suicide suffer from depression or other mental illnesses, as well as a substance misuse problem.[7] The key to preventing depression from increasing and leading to these catastrophic problems is to get professional help as soon as possible. However, many developing countries do not have this access to professional help. Despite the fact that there are proven, effective treatments for mental disorders, a great percentage of people in developing nations have no access to care.  Mental health services and programs should be addressed in developing countries. A lack of resources, a lack of educated healthcare workers, and the societal stigma associated with mental diseases are all barriers to effective care.

References

[1]“Depression and Other Common Mental Disorders: Global Health Estimates.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, 1 Jan. 1970, https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/254610.

[2]“Depression.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/depression.

[3]Reece, Tamekia. “7 Things We Now Know about Depression.” Content Lab U.S., Johnson & Johnson, 29 Sept. 2021, https://www.jnj.com/health-and-wellness/facts-about-depression.

[4]“Busting the Myth That Depression Doesn’t Affect People in Poor Countries.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 30 Apr. 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/30/busting-the-myth-that-depression-doesnt-affect-people-in-poor-countries.

[5]“Addressing Depression in Developing Countries.” BORGEN, 14 Feb. 2018, https://www.borgenmagazine.com/depression-in-developing-countries/#:~:text=Depression%20in%20developing%20countries%20looks%20different%20than%20in,and%20homelessness.%20These%20are%20all%20linked%20to%20depression.

[6]Ogbo, Felix Akpojene, et al. “The Burden of Depressive Disorders in South Asia, 1990–2016: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study.” BMC Psychiatry, BioMed Central, 16 Oct. 2018, https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-018-1918-1.

[7]Bruce, Debra Fulghum. “Side Effects of Untreated Depression.” WebMD, WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/depression/guide/untreated-depression-effects.